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Events During the Week of February 28th through March 7th, 2021

Monday, March 1st, 2021

Plasma Physics (Physics/ECE/NE 922) Seminar
Predicting runaway electron generation, confinement, and mitigation at ORNL
Time: 12:00 pm
Place: Zoom Meeting
Speaker: Matt Beidler, ORNL
Abstract: Chris Hegna is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://uwmadison.zoom.us/j/91835419103?pwd=YXhDdGlFeEZtc0c0MlZySUp0Q1FrUT09

Meeting ID: 918 3541 9103
Passcode: 578475
One tap mobile
+13126266799,,91835419103#,,,,*578475# US (Chicago)
+19292056099,,91835419103#,,,,*578475# US (New York)

Dial by your location
+1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
+1 929 205 6099 US (New York)
+1 301 715 8592 US (Washington D.C)
+1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
+1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
+1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
Meeting ID: 918 3541 9103
Passcode: 578475
Find your local number: https://uwmadison.zoom.us/u/aUzS5iS97

Join by SIP
91835419103@zoomcrc.com

Join by H.323
162.255.37.11 (US West)
162.255.36.11 (US East)
115.114.131.7 (India Mumbai)
115.114.115.7 (India Hyderabad)
213.19.144.110 (Amsterdam Netherlands)
213.244.140.110 (Germany)
103.122.166.55 (Australia)
149.137.40.110 (Singapore)
64.211.144.160 (Brazil)
69.174.57.160 (Canada)
207.226.132.110 (Japan)
Meeting ID: 918 3541 9103
Passcode: 578475
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Monday Science Seminar
Monday Science Seminar w/ Courtney Crawford (Louisiana State University)
Time: 12:00 pm
Place: https://uwmadison.zoom.us/j/96822123897?pwd=Z0ZESm1CNFRkUTVEMEIxM2RuN3h0UT09
Speaker: Courtney Crawford , Lousiana State University
Abstract: Title: R Coronae Borealis Stars: What Happens After a WD Merger?

White Dwarf (WD) mergers are a very active field of research within the astronomy community, and simulations of these events is an ever-growing body of work. While WD mergers themselves are fascinating, it is also interesting to consider the post-merger object and its evolution. A rare, enigmatic class of variable stars known as the R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are currently understood to be an evolutionary phase of these post-WD-merger objects. The goal of our group’s recent work has been to garner further evidence that RCB stars are formed from WD mergers, and further characterize the peculiarities of these stars. In this talk, I’ll present the ever-growing list of traits that make RCBs unique, as well as what we know about a WD merger that could create such an object.
Host: Snezana Stanimirovic & Melinda Soares-Furtado
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Plasma Theory Seminar
Effects of Triangularity on Ion Temperature Gradient Turbulence Saturation
Time: 4:00 pm
Place: Zoom meeting
Speaker: Joey Duff, UW-Madison
Abstract: Chris Hegna is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://uwmadison.zoom.us/j/9548787359?pwd=VndwdGVMd2doQzVBWlgrZFc1Ni9pUT09

Meeting ID: 954 878 7359
Passcode: 4Ugg1v

Join by SIP
http://9548787359@zoomcrc.com
Join by H.323
162.255.37.11 (US West)
162.255.36.11 (US East)
115.114.131.7 (India Mumbai)
115.114.115.7 (India Hyderabad)
213.19.144.110 (Amsterdam Netherlands)
213.244.140.110 (Germany)
103.122.166.55 (Australia)
149.137.40.110 (Singapore)
64.211.144.160 (Brazil)
69.174.57.160 (Canada)
207.226.132.110 (Japan)
Meeting ID: 954 878 7359
Passcode: 596249
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Tuesday, March 2nd, 2021

Network in Neutrinos, Nuclear Astrophysics, and Symmetries (N3AS) Seminar
Primordial Black Holes
Time: 2:00 pm
Place: https://berkeley.zoom.us/j/91922781599
Speaker: Volodymyr Takhistov , Kavli-IPMU
Abstract: TBD
Host: Baha Balantekin
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Wednesday, March 3rd, 2021

Climate & Diversity
Hostile and Intimidating Behavior Training
Time: 12:00 pm
Place: link to be provided
Abstract: Hostile and Intimidating Behavior Training: All employees of UW–Madison are encouraged to participate in Hostile and Intimidating Behavior Policy and Process Training. In a 90-minute case-based workshop, you will consider a number of scenarios to help identify what hostile and intimidating behavior is (and isn’t), and work with others to understand what your responsibilities are when you hear about or experience incidents of hostile and intimidating behavior. UW–Madison policies and campus resources will also be reviewed.
Host: Kevin Black
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Department Meeting
Time: 12:15 pm
Place: Virtual see "abstract" for connection info
Speaker: Sridhara Dasu, Department Chair
AIMEE N LEFKOW is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Department Meeting
Time: Jan 13, 2021 12:15 PM Central Time (US and Canada)
Every week on Wed, until May 12, 2021, 18 occurrence(s)
Jan 13, 2021 12:15 PM
Jan 20, 2021 12:15 PM
Jan 27, 2021 12:15 PM
Feb 3, 2021 12:15 PM
Feb 10, 2021 12:15 PM
Feb 17, 2021 12:15 PM
Feb 24, 2021 12:15 PM
Mar 3, 2021 12:15 PM
Mar 10, 2021 12:15 PM
Mar 17, 2021 12:15 PM
Mar 24, 2021 12:15 PM
Mar 31, 2021 12:15 PM
Apr 7, 2021 12:15 PM
Apr 14, 2021 12:15 PM
Apr 21, 2021 12:15 PM
Apr 28, 2021 12:15 PM
May 5, 2021 12:15 PM
May 12, 2021 12:15 PM
Please download and import the following iCalendar (.ics) files to your calendar system.
Weekly: https://uwmadison.zoom.us/meeting/tJYpfuCrrD4vEtyo-iHQ60Kr6o_QGlZ3oBT4/ics?icsToken=98tyKuCqqjIjGdaQtRGPRowQBor4XenzpiVYj7dEk1LsKxEFMijkYO19A5VzKovf

Join Zoom Meeting
https://uwmadison.zoom.us/j/92499325588?pwd=T3lwZjEveWJqNGgrU3ljRmdTS0hOdz09

Meeting ID: 924 9932 5588
Passcode: 337209
One tap mobile
+19292056099,,92499325588#,,,,*337209# US (New York)
+13017158592,,92499325588#,,,,*337209# US (Washington D.C)

Dial by your location
+1 929 205 6099 US (New York)
+1 301 715 8592 US (Washington D.C)
+1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
+1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
+1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
+1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
Meeting ID: 924 9932 5588
Passcode: 337209
Find your local number: https://uwmadison.zoom.us/u/abhpt7GE9P

Join by SIP
92499325588@zoomcrc.com

Join by H.323
162.255.37.11 (US West)
162.255.36.11 (US East)
115.114.131.7 (India Mumbai)
115.114.115.7 (India Hyderabad)
213.19.144.110 (Amsterdam Netherlands)
213.244.140.110 (Germany)
103.122.166.55 (Australia)
149.137.40.110 (Singapore)
64.211.144.160 (Brazil)
69.174.57.160 (Canada)
207.226.132.110 (Japan)
Meeting ID: 924 9932 5588
Passcode: 337209

Host: Sridhara Dasu
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Thursday, March 4th, 2021

Graduate Program Event
PhD Prospective Student VIRTUAL Visit Day
Time: 12:00 am
Place: Virtual
Speaker: PhD Program Faculty & Graduate Students, UW-Madison, Department of Physics
Abstract: All admitted Ph.D. students for Fall 2021 will be invited for prospective student virtual visit days. Graduate students and faculty will receive more information as the dates approach.
Host: Michelle Holland, Graduate Program Coordinator
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Astronomy Colloquium
What Sets the Efficiency of Radial Migration is Spiral Galaxies?
Time: 3:30 pm
Place: Zoom meeting(see Abstract ) Coffee and tea 3:30pm, Talk 3:45pm
Speaker: Kate Daniels, Bryn Mawr
Abstract: After an initial epoch of assembly, spiral galaxies like the Milky Way evolve primarily under the influence of slow, internal processes. This secular evolution rearranges the orbital angular momentum and energy of a galaxy’s disk, thus altering its kinematics, morphology, and chemical distribution. Central to our understanding of secular evolution is how transient spiral arms cause stars to migrate large radial distances from their birth radii. Radial migration is often associated with increased orbital eccentricity, thus kinematically heating the disk. However, a particularly important type of radial migration, called churning or cold torquing, can change the sizes of stellar orbits in the disk without significantly altering their eccentricities. The relative importance of cold or heating radial migration significantly impacts how disks evolve. In this talk, I will demystify the physics that governs various forms of radial migration and discuss their observational signatures. I will then present scaling relations for the efficiency of cold torquing. Finally, I will argue that in some limits cold torquing can, in fact, kinematically heat the disk. First steps have been taken, but there is an ongoing need to further develop this theoretical framework for the interpretation of data from high resolution simulations and large, high precision observational surveys of the Milky Way.

Zoom Link
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81316886240?pwd=RzlUdk5SRU5Xc1EyL0daTUFYUHBWU09

Host: Melinda Soares-Furtado
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Friday, March 5th, 2021

Graduate Program Event
PhD Prospective Student VIRTUAL Visit Day
Time: 12:00 am
Place: Virtual
Speaker: PhD Program Faculty & Graduate Students, UW-Madison, Department of Physics
Abstract: All admitted Ph.D. students for Fall 2021 will be invited for prospective student virtual visit days. Graduate students and faculty will receive more information as the dates approach.
Host: Michelle Holland, Graduate Program Coordinator
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Theory Seminar (High Energy/Cosmology)
Title to be announced
Time: 2:00 pm
Place: For zoom link, sign up at: https://groups.google.com/a/g-groups.wisc.edu/d/forum/theoryseminars/join
Speaker: Jordi Salvadó, University of Barcelona
Host: Lars Aalsma
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Physics Department Colloquium
From galaxies to faces: recognizing the implications of Artificial Intelligence in astronomy and society
Time: 3:30 pm
Place: Zoom: https://uwmadison.zoom.us/j/97126863667?pwd=Qk5vT0ttWm43Q01HSk5OdUZOQ1Z4UT09
Speaker: Dr. Brian Nord, Fermilab
Abstract: Artificial Intelligence (AI) refers to a set of techniques that rely primarily on the data itself for the construction of a quantitative model. AI has arguably been in development for three quarters of a century, but there has been a recent resurgence in research and application. This current (third) wave of AI progress is marked by extraordinary results --- for example, in image analysis, language translation, and machine automation. Despite the aforementioned modest definition of AI, its potential to disrupt technologies, economies, and society is often presented as (nearly) unmatched in modern times, due in part to the versatility of the algorithms in modeling a wide variety of data. Similarly, there is great promise for applications across the sciences --- for example, simulations, image classification, and automated experimentation --- which are currently being investigated by researchers across the globe. Along with the significant promise of AI, comes great peril: in societal contexts, the consequences include enhanced surveillance, facial recognition, and automated weaponry. In science contexts, the issues are also significant and in many cases related --- for example, bias, lack of uncertainty quantification, and misuse. To take full advantage of the opportunities for AI to accelerate science and improve society, it's essential that we carefully guide its development. During this presentation, we will explore modern AI techniques, like neural networks, and review how they are being developed and deployed in astronomy. Then, we’ll discuss ideas for the future usage of AI in science, including technical barriers for long-term application. Finally, we’ll discuss the roles of scientists and academic communities in the development of AI algorithms.
Host: Keith Bechtol
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